Offering Land

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Offering Land Overview: Start Here!

Cymraeg

Start here for an overview and introduction to the topic - Offering Land. This document is aimed primarily at landowners and land managers who may be thinking of offering land for use by community growing groups. CLAS has been set up to help landowners understand the potential benefits of community land use and to support them with advice and information around some of the challenges. To read the overview, simply click the document link below:

English

Tirfeddianwyr : Proses Ar gyfer Cynnig Tir

Mae’r canllaw cyffredinol hwn yn mynd â pherchnogion tir trwy’r broses sy’n gysylltiedig â chaniatáu gardd gymunedol i weithredu ar eich tir. Mae’n rhoi i berchnogion tir broses cam wrth gam eang a dolenni i adnoddau gwybodaeth defnyddiol a grëwyd gan CLAS. Fodd bynnag, mae’n bwysig cofio mai enghraifft yw hon a gall fod angen amrywio’r broses hon ar gyfer amgylchiadau gwahanol a grwpiau gwahanol.

Tirfeddianwyr : Proses Ar gyfer Cynnig Tir

Welsh

Guidance for Registered Social Landlords

This guidance is aimed at Registered Social Landlords such as housing associations which may want to get involved in community gardening or design community gardens or allotments into their plans. It is intended as a primer to help RSLs understand the needs and benefits of community growing and draws on examples of current housing-led community growing projects and explains how each has been developed.

English

Case Study: The Grove Community Garden

The former site of the Fountain Brewery in the Fountainbridge area of central Edinburgh, which has been earmarked for development in the future, has been the focus of a partnership between Grosvenor, an international property development business, and a local community group to turn part of the site into a 'meanwhile' community garden.

English

Land For Bees

If you have a community garden or other growing space, you may want to consider keeping bees.  You could look after them yourself, or offer a site for beehives in on your garden. Below is what you need to know about land and community bee keeping.

English

Planning: Green Space Designations

Neighbourhood Plans establishes general planning policies for the development and use of land in a locality. The plans are drawn up by Neighbourhood Planning Groups and are influential. According to the Government, Neighbourhood plans are intended to allow local people to get the right type of development for their community, while still meeting the needs of the wider area.

English

Useful Link: Edible Estates Good Practice Guide

Neighbourhoods Green, a partnership initiative which highlights the importance of open space for residents of social housing and works with social landlords to raise the quality of their design, management and safe use, has published a comprehensive guide for Housing Associations about community growing on their land.

The guide covers resident led projects, housing association led projects and third party led projects. You can find the guide by clicking the following link:

English

Video: Chilterns Community CIC

A video from Shared Assets about a new community interest company being spun out from the woodland service at Wycombe District Council to manage 14 local authority owned woodlands.

Chiltern Rangers CIC from Shared Assets on Vimeo.

 

English

Planning: Planning Policy & Community Growing

Sustain have produced a special guide to using planning policy to meet strategic objectives through community food growing.

The guide brings together examples of planning policies around the UK that support community food growing. It is aimed primarily at planning authorities to help them to use food growing as a way of creating healthy communities. 

This is a specific recommendation within the Planning Practice Guidance that goes with the National Planning Policy Framework for England, but a principle that is relevant across the UK.

English

Overview: Rent

When land is going to be taken on for a community gardening project or any other food-growing project, it is usual to have a discussion about rent. Due to the unique nature of community growing sites, it is very difficult to give guidance on a typical rent (price per acre). CLAS did a survey and found groups paying between zero and £1,000 per acre.

This paper will help you calculate what rent should be paid. It can also be used to quantify the value to the project of rent-free (zero rent) or a rent paid in kind.

English

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© Community Land Advisory Service 2018