Allotments

Leases: Flowchart for Lease Type

The Community Land Advisory Service has created a flowchart to guide you to find the right type of lease or licence for your particular project or interest.

Simply download the document, choose which category best suits your group or situation and then answer the questions. You will be led through to a type of lease or licence - click on the link in the box to be taken to the right page on the website.

Lease Type Flowchart

 

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Finding Land Overview: Start Here

Start here with an overview of the topic: Finding Land. This document is aimed at new community growing groups, landowners and groups already on a site who might be looking to expand or add to the site. You can download the document using the link below:

Finding Land Overview: Start Here

 

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Case Study: Borth Community Gardens

Borth Community Gardens is an initiative to create a space for local people to grow their own food in a communal environment. The allotments and community gardens are located near St. Matthew's Church, Borth, Ceredigion. Activities on the site include gardening, work parties by locals and visiting groups, as well as Open Day events and more informal get-togethers. In addition to cultivated land, the gardens are now home to several chickens, a couple of ducks and bee hives on the community garden section.

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CLAS co-writes allotment guidance for community growers

New guidance aimed at sweeping away confusion around allotment law and helping get more communities growing their own food, has been published by the Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens and the Community Land Advisory Service.

The Allotment Law & Community Growing Factsheet, endorsed by the Government’s Department for Communities and Local Government, demystifies where allotment law applies to community growers and when sites become designated as statutory allotments.

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Guidance for Registered Social Landlords

This guidance is aimed at Registered Social Landlords such as housing associations which may want to get involved in community gardening or design community gardens or allotments into their plans. It is intended as a primer to help RSLs understand the needs and benefits of community growing and draws on examples of current housing-led community growing projects and explains how each has been developed.

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Planning: Green Space Designations

Neighbourhood Plans establishes general planning policies for the development and use of land in a locality. The plans are drawn up by Neighbourhood Planning Groups and are influential. According to the Government, Neighbourhood plans are intended to allow local people to get the right type of development for their community, while still meeting the needs of the wider area.

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Approaching Local Authorities - Top Tips

Cymraeg

If you are having trouble finding a suitable site for your community growing group,  or if you have already found a site but are not sure who owns it,  then approaching your local authority is a good starting point as they often control or own disused land.  However, it can be daunting to approach such a big institution and hard to know where to start or even who to ask. The following top tips will help you get started.

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Finding Land: Site Features Checklist

Before you can decide whether a site or land agreement is suitable for your group, you need to plan what you will use the land for, both now and in the future. This checklist will help you prepare for your land search and for the agreement with the land owner. Tell the landowner what you expect to build and what you think your requirements will be. Make sure essential items are permitted in the lease.

Site Features Checklist

 

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Leases: Rent Survey

CLAS has surveyed a random sample of community gardens about their land agreements and what rent they pay. The projects surveyed are diverse in scale, purpose and location. Some are trading, others are social; some are informal and others are incorporated. The landlords are also varied. Some are local authorities, others are private. Some land is rural, some urban. The rents paid vary from zero to over a thousand pounds.

Obviously rental amounts vary enormously and are based on each individual circumstance, but examples may be useful as a starting point for discussion.

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Useful Link: National Allotment Society (formerly NSALG)

National Allotment Society

01536 266 576

www.nsalg.org.uk

Formerly known as the National Society for Allotments and Leisure Gardeners, this is a members’ co-operative which protects, promotes and preserves allotments. It provides advice and information to both allotment holders and home gardeners. NAS has a legal team and can help draft non-standard agreements between councils or private landlords and allotment associations.

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