England

Planning: Green Space Designations

Neighbourhood Plans establishes general planning policies for the development and use of land in a locality. The plans are drawn up by Neighbourhood Planning Groups and are influential. According to the Government, Neighbourhood plans are intended to allow local people to get the right type of development for their community, while still meeting the needs of the wider area.

English

Valuing Grasslands - Environmental Impact Assessment

Community gardens value their local natural environments and are keen to look after native ecosystems. However, some may overlook the habitat value of grassland.

While grassland may not always look appealing or exciting, some areas contain very active and precious ecosystems which should not be disturbed. For example, they may contain wildflowers that are becoming rarer and support a wide range of insects, mammals and birds of prey that feed on them.

English

Case Study: Whistlewood Common, Derbyshire

A group in Melbourne, Derbyshire have launched a community share offer to buy 10 acres of former market garden land to create Whistlewood Common, which will be used for food production and associated uses. The project’s aim is to create a productive landscape where every plant, shrub and tree is edible or otherwise useful to the local community.

English

Approaching Local Authorities - Top Tips

Cymraeg

If you are having trouble finding a suitable site for your community growing group,  or if you have already found a site but are not sure who owns it,  then approaching your local authority is a good starting point as they often control or own disused land.  However, it can be daunting to approach such a big institution and hard to know where to start or even who to ask. The following top tips will help you get started.

English

The Big Dig

Big Dig Information



The Big Dig, a nationwide project to get people growing food together, involves community growing projects across England. As well as working with established community growing spaces, The Big Dig will develop new sites and aim to attract volunteers from communities who traditionally do not volunteer. The project, funded by the Cabinet Office's Social Action Fund and will also be running a series of open days and events to encourage another 13,000 people to get down to their local growing site.

Undefined
Subscribe to RSS - England

Contact:

© Community Land Advisory Service 2018